Jetona Koçibelli, Back to 90’s chic & mystery

Where is utopia?
Jetona Koçibelli: Utopia is in everyone’s minds, as well as in my own. It follows me as a sign I try to catch. All I want is to make that unrealized thing possible. It is like that energy that pursues you, to remind you that it is there to tell you that you can do it. The strongest Utopia sometimes it is just you. Because yourself turns out to be your friend and at the same time it can turn into the biggest obstacle in what you want to realize.

What turns you on creatively, spiritually or emotionally? 
Jetona Koçibelli: Anything that may seem very ordinary at a first glance. Starting from that good morning coffee flavor, the scent of freshly baked bread, the delight of a honest conversation with someone. A good movie or a book, a glass of wine in the evenings, without caring about anything else.
A delightful classic flavor that culminates with such music. The smiling of a child. The gratification of doing a good job, roses that you receive without a return address. But the greatest inspiration is my own freedom. It is my sky and my air. It is the fire of my own existence.

What turns you off?
Jetona Koçibelli: Vulgarity, to be salable only because you need to. Pretending to be, the flattering attitude of interest. Untrue things, compromised often by the unnecessary. The cold eyes of a calculator. The malevolent tendencies and people who have never made mistakes in life.

How Much Do the Myths of History Impact on the Lives of the Present? Jetona Koçibelli: I’m not pro myths. History is not an unchangeable thing. The beauty stands precisely in this, in the daily richness. Yes, maybe the truth is that history is written by the victors indeed, but that will not be the case, because generations will always find interesting facts to be interpreted. I think history and it’s characters should be depleted from myths.

What is utopia made of?
Jetona Koçibelli: From minor fears, doubts, memories, experiences, myths, passions, desires, suppression and ideas!

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?
Jetona Koçibelli: Being empty of any kind of feeling and emotion. Life is in itself a thrill. How can we otherwise feel that we are alive and exist? Therefore, I will always embrace emotion, even if you are hurt, or filled with the devil. They are us, our interior is naked and unprotected. At the end of the day, should we be next? Walls are only self-defense illusions, which in the end are nothing but self-destructive.

What is your idea of earthly utopian human?
Jetona Koçibelli: I like to see a movie that does not have a solution. Why should it have one? After all, such is life itself. My idea is that there does not provides solutions.

To what faults do you feel most indulgent?
Jetona Koçibelli: It’s what I did in the name of the love of the moment. What it has been the worth of it, what did I gain from that experience. The mistakes that made me reflect, those mistakes for which I took bigger steps in my life. Now, tell me if you can call them a mistake!

What is your favorite virtue?
Being true and far from the absurd of perfection. Being right and clean with regard to others and yourself. But of course if I should choose the virtue of virtues, for me it is kindness. You can have a lot of things, but it’s so hard to have kindness! You can behave well, but this doesn’t mean you’re kind, you may be aware, but you have no kindness, you can do a good action, But it doesn’t mean you do it for kindness. I think KINDNESS should be the greatest human goal.

What is your Utopian action?
Jetona Koçibelli: To dream about what it can be turned into reality. I know that dreaming is not an action, it is not tangible. There would be no more utopias, but only a dream with a naive start and a useful end. If utopia helps us at something, this is nothing else but an awakening to a new reality where we regain ourselves. I remember once when I caught myself immersed in a distant, endless, mischievous thought inside the cloud of a utopia. Flying to catch a transparent balloon in an endless sky, it seemed to me that everything around me had ceased to exist. I thought for a moment that I was dreaming and I joined my palms to see if it was utopia or reality. I learned something: that utopia from reality is just as close to one side to the other side of the palm.

 

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Enri Mato

Enri Mato is an architect and photographer born in 1986 in an artist family. His father was a sculptor and his mother was a restorative, who worked in the Louvre Museum. He grew up in Tirana, Albania where he discovered his interest in photography and art at an early age. In 2005 Enri moved to Paris to study Photography and Architecture. He later pursued masters dergree in Urban Design between Geneva and Tirana. He graduated with a research project called Remembrance. Through his thriving business Enri had the opportunity to travel the world to share his vision and experiences with an international audience.

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